Ava and Chasing the Iguana

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Left to Right: Nicole Worth (Charlotte), Stephen Carl (Shannon), Gwen Sullivan (Hannah), and Stephanie Kellogg (Maxine).

Well friends, the Ava Gardner Museum has been absolutely hopping! Top that off with the announcement that the Ava Gardner Trust will be honored with a historic Blue Plate at Ava’s Knightsbridge, London home in the fall during the English Heritage Foundation’s 150th celebration of the Blue Plates means that we are all abuzz here in preparation. It takes months, and in this case, even years to organize events like this.  We are hoping to release more information soon. I will be traveling to England in May in order to help firm up details and give them to you then. Of course, we will be visiting Ava’s home and some of her old haunts and sharing with you via our social media and our new Periscope app! Make sure to keep tuning in.

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Richard Burton and Ava Gardner in “Night of the Iguana” (1964).

One of our big events just took place in February. The Ava Gardner Museum hosted auditions for the Neuse Little Theatre’s production of “The Night of the Iguana,” a play by Neuse Little Theater Night of the Iguana promoTennessee Williams which Ava brought to life on the silver screen in 1964. As this is Ava’s hometown, this was the first time the Theatre was bringing this sacred role to life. Those closest to Ava believe that the role of Maxine Faulk was effortless for Ava and that she was essentially portraying herself. It is the closest that you will ever see to who she truly was. Ava’s niece Mary Edna Grantham told me that everything from the way she laughed to the way she put her hand on her hip was pure Ava Gardner. Ava herself said, “John let me go back to my North Carolina accent, which meant that I got to say things like “cotton-pickin’” and call folks ‘honey,’ which, you can imagine, wasn’t exactly a strain….In one scene, when I was supposed to say, ‘In a pig’s eye you are,’ what came out was, ‘In a pig’s ass you are.’ Old habits die awfully hard.”[1]  Ava was challenged by the role despite being herself.  Working with John Huston, Ray Stark, and Tennessee Williams- all with different conceptualizations of how the story should be portrayed- made Ava blossom into a raw, earthy character which has earned her the praise of her career. Although the film was not one of the most memorable in Hollywood History, it did prove that Ava’s star was still on the ascent.  Upon reading positive reviews she dryly noted, “Hell, I suppose if you stick around long enough they have to say something nice about you.”[2] And I suppose she isn’t wrong!

Carl and Stephanie Neuse Little Theatre Night of the Iguana

Stephen Carl & Stephanie Kellogg have a little fun recreating the iconic shot!

The Neuse Little Theatre wanted to bring Ava’s most realistic role to life on-stage in Ava’s hometown, and to spearhead the project was director Tony Pender and title cast of Stephen Carl  as Rev. T. Lawrence Shannon,  Stephanie Kellogg as Maxine Faulk (Ava’s role), Gwen Sullivan as Hannah Jelks, Randy Jordan as Nonno Coffin, and  Nicole Worth as Charlotte Goodall.  The play ran from February 19 through February 27 and I was invited to speak to both the cast and the opening night crowd, for which I am very grateful.  I encouraged people to not try to imitate or perceive imitation of Ava or the other characters on-screen and they were inimitable, but rather to take the characters and make them their own- which they did wonderfully! Even one of Ava’s relatives went to see the show, but the cast was not aware till after.  The play was more sexually charged than the film but was carried out without a smutty air.  The actors were younger than the title characters and this changed the dynamic between them to a different degree. The set was beautifully designed and was reminiscent of coastal Mexico. You almost felt like you were there.  The play garnered positive to neutral reviews, citing that the production had potential to grow. You can read more about that here.

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Board Member Anita Liverman poses with the catered tropical display.

In order to celebrate, the Ava Gardner Museum held a Theatre members-only closing party following the final performance on the evening of Sunday, February 28. Caterer Donald Bailey provided tropical décor within the museum, outdone only by his unique fusion of

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Museum Director Deanna Brandenberger (left) and docent Abby Johnson (right).

tropical fare which was too delicious to describe! The cast enjoyed relaxing with their supporters and basking in the comfort of the museum after all their hard work.  Photos were taken and goodbyes were said. I think that the cast and crew did a wonderful job with a terribly complicated script and Ava would have been honored to have them in her hometown.

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Punch table at the reception. No rum-coco’s unfortunately.

We have recently reinstated our Campaign for a Museum Fire Suppression System and are seeking donations and sharing word-of-mouth in order to reach our goal. While we are picking up momentum, we are still far away from our target of $96,000. You can find out more about our endeavor by clicking here. Any amount helps!

 

Also, we are participating in Belk’s annual charity sale taking place on April 30. By purchasing a $5 ticket (of which the museum keeps 100% proceeds), you automatically get $5 off your next purchase as well as deep discounts, exclusive shopping, and a chance to win a gift card worth $5 to $1000 for the first 100 customers that day. Purchase your ticket here.

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AGM Board Secretary Melissa Godwin Overton, NLT Board Member Theressa Rose, and AGM Executive Director Deanna Brandenberger pose barefoot in tribute to Ava’s humble performance.

Thank you for your patience on the intermittent blogs as we strive to bring you more regular updates. Remember to download the Periscope app for a chance to interact with us LIVE!

 

Click here for an exclusive sneak peak inside the museum in the meantime!

 

~Deanna Brandenberger

AGM Executive Director/Estate Trustee

 

 

[1] Gardner, Ava. “Ava: My Story.” New York, NY: Bantam Books, 251.

[2] Gardner, 252.

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