Ava and Chasing the Iguana

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Left to Right: Nicole Worth (Charlotte), Stephen Carl (Shannon), Gwen Sullivan (Hannah), and Stephanie Kellogg (Maxine).

Well friends, the Ava Gardner Museum has been absolutely hopping! Top that off with the announcement that the Ava Gardner Trust will be honored with a historic Blue Plate at Ava’s Knightsbridge, London home in the fall during the English Heritage Foundation’s 150th celebration of the Blue Plates means that we are all abuzz here in preparation. It takes months, and in this case, even years to organize events like this.  We are hoping to release more information soon. I will be traveling to England in May in order to help firm up details and give them to you then. Of course, we will be visiting Ava’s home and some of her old haunts and sharing with you via our social media and our new Periscope app! Make sure to keep tuning in.

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Richard Burton and Ava Gardner in “Night of the Iguana” (1964).

One of our big events just took place in February. The Ava Gardner Museum hosted auditions for the Neuse Little Theatre’s production of “The Night of the Iguana,” a play by Neuse Little Theater Night of the Iguana promoTennessee Williams which Ava brought to life on the silver screen in 1964. As this is Ava’s hometown, this was the first time the Theatre was bringing this sacred role to life. Those closest to Ava believe that the role of Maxine Faulk was effortless for Ava and that she was essentially portraying herself. It is the closest that you will ever see to who she truly was. Ava’s niece Mary Edna Grantham told me that everything from the way she laughed to the way she put her hand on her hip was pure Ava Gardner. Ava herself said, “John let me go back to my North Carolina accent, which meant that I got to say things like “cotton-pickin’” and call folks ‘honey,’ which, you can imagine, wasn’t exactly a strain….In one scene, when I was supposed to say, ‘In a pig’s eye you are,’ what came out was, ‘In a pig’s ass you are.’ Old habits die awfully hard.”[1]  Ava was challenged by the role despite being herself.  Working with John Huston, Ray Stark, and Tennessee Williams- all with different conceptualizations of how the story should be portrayed- made Ava blossom into a raw, earthy character which has earned her the praise of her career. Although the film was not one of the most memorable in Hollywood History, it did prove that Ava’s star was still on the ascent.  Upon reading positive reviews she dryly noted, “Hell, I suppose if you stick around long enough they have to say something nice about you.”[2] And I suppose she isn’t wrong!

Carl and Stephanie Neuse Little Theatre Night of the Iguana

Stephen Carl & Stephanie Kellogg have a little fun recreating the iconic shot!

The Neuse Little Theatre wanted to bring Ava’s most realistic role to life on-stage in Ava’s hometown, and to spearhead the project was director Tony Pender and title cast of Stephen Carl  as Rev. T. Lawrence Shannon,  Stephanie Kellogg as Maxine Faulk (Ava’s role), Gwen Sullivan as Hannah Jelks, Randy Jordan as Nonno Coffin, and  Nicole Worth as Charlotte Goodall.  The play ran from February 19 through February 27 and I was invited to speak to both the cast and the opening night crowd, for which I am very grateful.  I encouraged people to not try to imitate or perceive imitation of Ava or the other characters on-screen and they were inimitable, but rather to take the characters and make them their own- which they did wonderfully! Even one of Ava’s relatives went to see the show, but the cast was not aware till after.  The play was more sexually charged than the film but was carried out without a smutty air.  The actors were younger than the title characters and this changed the dynamic between them to a different degree. The set was beautifully designed and was reminiscent of coastal Mexico. You almost felt like you were there.  The play garnered positive to neutral reviews, citing that the production had potential to grow. You can read more about that here.

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Board Member Anita Liverman poses with the catered tropical display.

In order to celebrate, the Ava Gardner Museum held a Theatre members-only closing party following the final performance on the evening of Sunday, February 28. Caterer Donald Bailey provided tropical décor within the museum, outdone only by his unique fusion of

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Museum Director Deanna Brandenberger (left) and docent Abby Johnson (right).

tropical fare which was too delicious to describe! The cast enjoyed relaxing with their supporters and basking in the comfort of the museum after all their hard work.  Photos were taken and goodbyes were said. I think that the cast and crew did a wonderful job with a terribly complicated script and Ava would have been honored to have them in her hometown.

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Punch table at the reception. No rum-coco’s unfortunately.

We have recently reinstated our Campaign for a Museum Fire Suppression System and are seeking donations and sharing word-of-mouth in order to reach our goal. While we are picking up momentum, we are still far away from our target of $96,000. You can find out more about our endeavor by clicking here. Any amount helps!

 

Also, we are participating in Belk’s annual charity sale taking place on April 30. By purchasing a $5 ticket (of which the museum keeps 100% proceeds), you automatically get $5 off your next purchase as well as deep discounts, exclusive shopping, and a chance to win a gift card worth $5 to $1000 for the first 100 customers that day. Purchase your ticket here.

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AGM Board Secretary Melissa Godwin Overton, NLT Board Member Theressa Rose, and AGM Executive Director Deanna Brandenberger pose barefoot in tribute to Ava’s humble performance.

Thank you for your patience on the intermittent blogs as we strive to bring you more regular updates. Remember to download the Periscope app for a chance to interact with us LIVE!

 

Click here for an exclusive sneak peak inside the museum in the meantime!

 

~Deanna Brandenberger

AGM Executive Director/Estate Trustee

 

 

[1] Gardner, Ava. “Ava: My Story.” New York, NY: Bantam Books, 251.

[2] Gardner, 252.

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The Writer & The Rose of Smithfield

Writer and Rose Doris and Ava

Doris Rollins Cannon (left), author of “Grabtown Girl” and local Hollywood actress Ava Gardner (right).

 

Roses. They seemed to have so much significance in the life of Johnston County native and Hollywood actress Ava Gardner. In 1929, Ava made her acting debut in the Brogden community’s production of A Rose Dream.  Ava got the part of a little girl named Rose “who wandered from home, became lost, and fell asleep under a tree.” The child experiences the wonders of Fairyland and eventually must return from whence she came when the Fairy Queen tells her, “A mortal child can never stay/In Fairyland but for a day.”[1]  

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Ava as “Little Rose” in her first performance of “A Rose Dream.”

Ava’s life would eventually go on to ironically imitate art. She would go to the Fairyland of Hollywood and frolic and then realize it was time to leave. She would do this many times in her life, reinventing herself with each cycle from Spain to London and eventually, home to Smithfield.  Ava’s affinity for roses as a child became a symbol of not just love, but loyalty. In her childhood best friend Clara’s autograph book she once scribbled:

 

                                                    

                                Roses may wither

                                Stems may die

                                Friends may forsake you

                                But never will I.[2]

 

I really want you to think about that for a moment, because it says everything about Ava’s fundamental character that you need to know. I want you to flash forward to Ava post-1968, in her London apartment in Knightsbridge. I want you to imagine her bedroom and in it a bureau of drawers on top of which sits a withering vase of yellow roses that should have been thrown out long ago. I want you to visualize a time lapse for the next few weeks and months till you see a hint of Christmas lights and decorations emanating from another room. Christmas Eve was also the day that Frank Sinatra’s “Angel” would be getting her yearly birthday bouquet of yellow roses to replace the ones that she kept on her dresser for an entire year before that. Roses withering, stems dying, friends flitting in Ava rose and mirrorand out during the fleeting months, and the constant reliability of the love of her life gesturing through the delivery of flowers, the thing that she would never be to him: she would never be forsaken. Their lives may have taken them in completely different directions, they may have been in relationships or even married to someone else, but the profound connection that they shared would last until her death.

 

 

You wouldn’t really know the symbolism it all represented – you wouldn’t really know the intricacies of what helped make Ava Gardner the woman, not just the movie star- if it hadn’t been for another woman’s recordkeeping. Doris Rollins Cannon, a journalist and newspaper editor of The Smithfield Herald, in Ava’s hometown (please keep in mind that Grabtown/Brogden is a rural community affiliated with the town). Ever since Ava has been a source of admiration in her public life, there have been people trying to cash in on her name and fame, making money off unauthorized enterprises (even if what they create are outright lies), and trying to immortalize their name in a vain attempt at touting “expertise” about an Ava Gardner they never knew nor even researched properly.  Ava herself found this extremely distasteful and would be sickened that it is still continuing even to this day. While writing her own autobiography Ava once told Peter Evans “I’m just not happy about having strangers digging around in my panties drawer, honey.”[3]  Ava felt that the only true representations of herself would be the ones that were down-to-earth and in her experience, she needed to have some agency in keeping them that way.  She had been absolutely distressed whenever tabloids printed about her and evading the paparazzi became something that literally made her flee entire continents.

 

       What is so maddening about these things is that they take an acorn, a little kernel of            truth, and build an oak tree of lies. It hurts every time it happens. You never get used        to it. Never. And it hurts to have to swallow it without answering. But it’s best not to.

                                                                                   ~Ava Gardner[4]

 

Ava’s distrust is something that was never really ameliorated. Peter Evans chronicled his on-and-off again assignment with her in detail. Her reticence was not only to protect herself but more importantly, those of whom she loved, like Frank Sinatra, who she would never betray.  Still, she knew that curiosity would get the better of many people and they would come up with stories on their own if she didn’t set the record straight.

 

 I know a lot of men fantasize about me; that’s how Hollywood gossip becomes                   Hollywood history. Someday someone is going to say, ‘All the lies ever told about Ava Gardner are true,’ and the truth about me, just like the truth about poor, maligned Marilyn [Monroe] will disappear like names on old tombstones. I know I’m not defending a spotless reputation. Hell, it’s too late for that….It’s just that I’d like to keep the books straight while I’m still around and sufficiently sober and compos mentis to do it,’ she said.[5]

 

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Ava at the premiere of “The Barefoot Contessa” (1954).

Even Peter Evans respected her wishes in not publishing the project after she called it off.  His family and publisher sought post-mortem collaboration with the Ava Gardner Trust years in the making in order to finally release the book which became a bestseller! So it boggles the mind how some people can show such disrespect and disregard for a woman, her family and her estate that she loved, and even go further to publicly denigrate it. Yet it happens and it just speaks to their nefarious motives and the type of people they are.  How can you do proper research on the real Ava Gardner without doing investigating and speaking with those closest to her? How do you make a legitimate book?  These were questions that Doris Cannon tackled before she even decided to go ahead with her own project that would eventually be published in 2001, Grabtown Girl: Ava Gardner’s North Carolina Childhood and Her Enduring Ties to Home. It would become one of the pivotal works on Ava’s background and personal life before and after Hollywood.

 

Most of the material in [the] book came from interviews with Ava’s family and friends, including many who have died since sharing their memories….A number of books have been written about Ava Gardner….so why another? The answer is that previous books, including her 1990 autobiography, largely focused on her years as a celebrated actress, her many romances, and her marriages to three famous men.  The aim of Grabtown Girl  is to tell who Ava Gardner was at root level – a girl who was strengthened by and remained true to her rural North Carolina heritage.[6]

 

With an altruistic purpose, the permission of Ava’s estate, family and those closest to her, as well as Ava’s own permission (a trust that was so hard to gain), Doris could move forward with a clear conscience and purpose; the hallmark of a legitimate and objective researcher. Doris summed it up in Ava’s own words when a local newspaper journalist Tom Lassiter asked if she would mind if they wrote a story on her, Ava said, “Listen, I don’t care what you write, as long as you tell the truth.”[7]

 

Doris first met Ava in the spring of 1978, following her appearance at Rock Ridge Reunion

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Ava’s nervousness is apparent during her appearance at the Rock Ridge Reunion day with NC Governor Jim Hunt in 1978.

Day to which she was invited by North Carolina Governor Jim Hunt. Doris and Ava met at Ava’s brother Jack’s house in Smithfield where Ava was found barefoot and without makeup but was still beautiful and welcoming.  Doris noted that she did not want to talk about her career or Hollywood but was more interested in expressing who she was beyond the façade that everyone claimed to know.  She loved to talk about being home in Johnston County and how she felt at peace among the birds and pine trees under the North Carolina sky.[8]  You will know this is the real Ava if you talk to any person who ever met her. She was not the leering screen goddess unless she wanted to be, and yet people ascribe only that glamor to her. Why? She was so much more!

 

Over the years, Doris became instrumental in collaborating with Dr. Tom and Lorraine Banks who had the largest collection of Ava’s memorabilia known at that time. Tom’s personal connection with Ava is the well-known story of a capture and kiss during his boyhood that he never forgot. In 1979, Doris helped him bring his collection to Smithfield for a limited exhibition which was successful. She convinced them to settle it permanently in Johnston County and it found homes in the Brogden Teacherage and two downtown locations before finally opening in its permanent location in 2000.[9]  Doris’ involvement facilitated a need for tribute and a cultural asset to a county which is often overshadowed by its agricultural reputation.  It is very clear that preserving Ava’s legacy was always her goal, even before Ava’s passing. This is something we will revisit at a later time.

Copy of First Ava Advocates 1978-Thom-n-Anne Duncan-Tom Banks-Doris Cannon

The first Ava Advocates (left to right): Anne & Thom Duncan, Dr. Tom Banks, and Doris Rollins Cannon (1978).

 

Today marks the 26th anniversary of Ava’s interment at Sunset Memorial Park in Smithfield. Doris Cannon wrote and read the eulogy that is oft-repeated on this blog, where Ava’s words of wisdom were to have more kindness in the world, starting with ourselves. On August 18, 2015, we lost the woman, the writer, the first Ava advocate who worked so tirelessly for the cause that we all carry on.  It was a tremendous loss for us in the Ava community, at the museum, and personally.  I will never forget the first time that I met Doris. Suffering from the effects of cancer and heart failure, when she could muster the strength despite that, she showed up at the museum a few weeks after I started working, introduced herself and gave me a big hug saying, “You are just as beautiful as everyone says you are.” Isn’t that the most wonderful way to meet someone? I weep now to think about how she emanated kindness and instilled a kindred connection with everyone here at the museum and in the community. Almost a year later, after I underwent a serious illness and operation, she called because she hadn’t heard from me, but she knew I was going in for surgery and she wanted to make sure I had gotten a card she sent me before I went. Two months later, she would be on her own deathbed, but here she was, worrying about a young lady she had known and worked with for just a year. A beautiful soul and a tremendous loss in more than just a historic capacity.

 

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Doris Rollins Cannon (left) with Ava’s niece Mary Edna Grantham (right) in the library of the Ava Gardner Museum.

Speaking at both of the Ava Gardner historical marker dedication ceremonies in November, I emphasized how much we owe to Doris Rollins Cannon. There would be no Ava Gardner Museum, there would be no social media, and there would be no interaction and carrying on of Ava’s mission and memory to the degree that we have today, without the work of this woman and the friends who assisted her on the way (Ms. Eunice Norton sadly preceding her in passing in September of 2014).  So tomorrow, when I visit Ava’s grave, there will be two yellow roses placed on the footstone, because 26 years ago, Ms. Doris Cannon stood eulogizing with the intention that something as special as Ava’s success, a hometown girl “who made good,” should be remembered.

 

Those who knew, loved, and admired her most can hope that in her quiet reveries, she could still remember the sound of applause as the curtains swished to a close on her first-grade performance in the operetta at Brogden School.  They can hope that, in the still of a wintry London night, the sound of that applause rose ever higher and louder and traveled around the world, as Ava…like Little Rose, ended her mortal journey through Fairyland- and came home to stay.

 

And we can hope that for Doris Rollins Cannon as well. May they both rest in peace. You can read more about Ms. Cannon here. You can purchase her book through the museum by clicking here.

 

Ava Gardner airplane roses airport

 

Thank you for reading and stay tuned for more blogs throughout another exciting year!

 

~Deanna Brandenberger

AGM Executive Director

Trustee of the Ava Gardner Estate

 

[1] Cannon, Doris Rollins. Grabtown Girl: Ava Gardner’s North Carolina Childhood and Her Enduring Ties to Home. (Asheboro, NC:  Down Home Press, 2001), 35-36.

[2] Cannon, 37.

[3] Gardner and Evans, Ava and Peter. Ava Gardner: The Secret Conversations. (Simon & Schuster: New York, NY: 2013), 84.

[4] Gardner, Ava. Ava: My Story. (New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1990), 200.

[5] Gardner and Evans, 19-20.

[6] Cannon, 3-7.

[7] Cannon, 118.

[8] Cannon, 123-124.

[9] Cannon, 135.

“What I’d like to say about stardom is that it gave me everything I never wanted.” ~ Ava Gardner*

Whenever I read this quote, I think, me too, Ava.

       The quote is often misinterpreted to represent that she was unhappy with the way her life turned out, but as her autobiography closes, she says she would have stayed the course for the most part. I think that is relatable to many of our own experiences as everyday mortals. The relation I feel toward Ava is that her stardom has changed my life. Once again, this doesn’t make me terribly unique. Immortalized on the silver screen, Technicolor, and modern film; she is still the 25th most popular actress of all time according to the American Film Institute.  Her image has evoked emotion and inspiration to many of us the world over. Her wily wit and sultry passion has delighted us for decades.  What does make my situation unique is that my education led me down many unexpected career avenues, combined with my love for vintage film, and it landed me in the lap of Smithfield, North Carolina in November of last year- the home of the legendary silver screen siren herself. I never imagined that Ava’s stardom would give me a dream job I never knew I wanted.  While this blog will mostly focus on Ava and topics having to do with the Ava Gardner Museum, I wanted to introduce myself because it is my voice, my eyes, and my words that you will experience through if you are reading this blog. Therefore, I wanted to share a bit about myself and what I do at the Ava Gardner Museum with all of you.

About Me

     I think back to the first time I heard about her. My grandfather, a WWII pilot and author, told me that if I wanted to see what a real woman was, it was Ava Gardner. “Now there was a woman!” he would reminisce. “Poor little girl grew up in tobacco country. Had to get everything on her own merits.”  I knew just what he meant. She was raw, stimulating, independent- scrappy even. Yet she was gorgeous, gracious, a Southern lady. What an enigma! He would talk about her as a bombshell pinup, and I could easily imagine him drawing her on the side of his plane before taking off on a mission as so many pilots did back then. I don’t think he ever thought his love for her would end up becoming mine.  I read her autobiography at the age of 12 and then I gave it to him. At 91 years old, it is one of the few possessions he still hangs onto.

Ava's autobiography, published 1990.

Ava’s autobiography, published 1990.

A Northern California native, I grew up loving vintage films. My family had a few ties to the movie industry. My grandmother went to school with Judy Garland, my grandfather flew with Robert Taylor, and my great-aunt was a seamstress on the epic Ten Commandments.  Needless to say, vintage film was common in my home growing up. My mother was a fan of Howard Keel, Judy Garland, and Julie Andrews. Some of my most vivid memories are of The Sound of Music, The Wizard of Oz, and her favorite, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. My favorites were Lana Turner, Gene Tierney, Judy Garland and of course, Ava Gardner! Since Ava and Lana were Hollywood chums, I became even more interested in their lives. Dating and/or marrying the same men (Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra), hanging out at the same parties, and friendly box office competition- these women were some of the most glamorous of the age!

Great Basin archaeology September 2013

Great Basin archaeology September 2013

Eventually, I began higher education and working. I gained my Bachelor’s degree in History in Nevada and minored in Archaeology, and this is where my museology experience also began. First, as part of museum studies classes, then internships, then graduate research assistantships, volunteering and actually working in the field for pay. I think very few people go into museum studies and actually get a job right off the bat. That is why so many of us diversify our skills: so that eventually, we land where we belong.  I followed that with a Master’s degree in History. Not even history of film; I concentrated on the history Latin America and Europe.  I became an archaeologist, primarily in the Great Basin; a career which is not as romantic as it sounds. However, I often had amazing experiences that I couldn’t have anywhere else in the world.  I met some of the most unique people who I catch up with every once in a while too. I worked in other fields as well: mining/engineering, water rights, ISO and internal auditing, gambling and entertainment, in addition to cultural resource management. I am a bit of a workaholic I guess you could say. I went on to become a college instructor of history and humanities in the capitol of Carson City at the age of 27. I loved teaching college. That experience of sharing knowledge and gaining perspectives in an academic environment is such a rich one! Yet I never seemed to fit in. It was like I was constantly searching for the glass slipper of careers. That is until the economic recession caused me to move to North Carolina to be near family and leave the rain shadow desert of Reno far behind. I’ve never regretted it. It was one of the very few times gambling ever worked out for me.

How Does One Become a Museum Director?

            It takes confidence in experience, knowledge and credentials but those qualities also belong to the other thousands of qualified historians also out of work or job-hunting. The short answer is that a lot of it comes down to luck and the grace of God.  Right place, right time. Networking.  I volunteered and communicated with anyone in the region in my fields. Then one day, I remembered visiting the Ava Gardner Museum and realized I hadn’t asked to network with the director. Turns out, I had contacted him only a day after he had given his resignation because he was moving on to another position within the county. Serendipity?  Definitely.  I met with him and talked about the museum and his job- and I realized I was hungry for it.  I was impressed at how far the museum had come since its inception in the early 1980s and the developments that still needed to take place galvanized my resolve to be involved.  I knew I could help the museum to develop in new ways if I was given the chance. There was competition, but I proved myself and I also demonstrated that I had a passion for vintage film and a particular devotion to Ava.  Moreover, I had an intense attraction to what I could do with relating her to local as well as world history. What an honor. Then there was grandpa…. How proud he would be! And so he is.

I started my employment on July 1, 2014.  There is an old adage that if you love what you do, you never truly work a day in your life. I always thought that saying was utter hogwash until I became the director here. I love my job. I cannot say that enough. I love selling stardust and introducing such a remarkable woman, actress, and North Carolinian woman to the world. Ava is the archetypal country girl Cinderella. Dreams do come true folks, and they come true in Johnston County.  Not just for Ava, but for a lost California girl like me too.

AGM Board Chairwoman Mary Helen Wyatt (left) and Executive Director Deanna Brandenberger (right) share a smile at the Ava Gardner Festival, October 3, 2014.

AGM Board Chairwoman Mary Helen Wyatt (left) and Executive Director Deanna Brandenberger (right) share a smile at the Ava Gardner Festival, October 3, 2014.

What does a Museum Executive Director do?

         Our museum is small 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Organization. I am the only full-time staff member. I have three part-time docents, and they take turns on day shifts; I have a part-time bookkeeper as well.  That means everything else is left to me.  Administration, finance, museum curation and conservation, oral history, heritage tours, sales and marketing, exhibit design, public relations, fundraising and grant-writing, community relations and outreach, social media, and a myriad of miscellaneous responsibilities. As you can imagine, these categories are really an umbrella for everything a director does.  I literally change air filters and light bulbs on some days.  There is no job too big or too small for a director. Fortunately, I have wonderful Board members who are willing to roll up their sleeves alongside me.  Everyone involved with this museum cares about it on a personal level and they contribute. Some of them even knew Ava; two are even family members! So if you are interested in the success story of an underdog effort like ours, you have to know that it is because of these people who turn the gears and their efforts are the oil to the machine.

I also became the Trustee of the Ava Gardner Estate. This position is separate from my position as the museum executive director and there is no remuneration. It is a sacred duty for me because I love Ava and what is left of her legacy in her estate deserves the best management it can get. When it comes to the Trust, my obligation has to remain separate from my duties as a museum director.  The trustee is responsible not only for the finances of the estate, but anyone who wishes to utilize the intellectual property, an image or likeness, or copyright of Ava’s must get my approval. It is an honor to serve Ava in this very personal role and to ensure that her name and image are used in an appropriate and beneficial way.

 Why don’t I have 10 arms?

            Everyone has an opinion, and believe it or not, I love to hear every one of them. The most common thing I hear is critiquing on why I don’t do more in one area or another. Simply put, it’s usually because I do not have time or resources. It always comes down to those two things. Would I love to have at least two assistants? Absolutely! Is it possible on a non-profit budget like ours? Not unless I can find a way to fund it. Fundraising, grants, sponsorships, admissions and gift shop sales are the way we do this. Those processes in themselves take time. One project can offset the needs of another and time balance is critical when you are only one person. Are we spread thin here? Yes. However, everything we present is quality and our reviews and feedback show consistently that as a specialized film museum, we are uniquely successful and enjoyable to our visitors. Expansion and development is a long-term goal but it will take years. We depend on our Ava fans and advocates supporting us, giving feedback, and visiting when they can.  In turn, we try to keep refreshing our exhibits and making each experience a pleasant one with new items to see.

As I begin this blog, I want to open up a dialogue with you: the Ava fans and the visitors, no matter where you are in the world. We will discuss the museum, our projects, Ava’s personal life, her career, and her legacy. Write me questions with what you are curious about or your comments and suggestions. I want to hear them! Comment below the blog or write me an email at avainfo@avagardner.org . Thank you for letting me introduce myself to you and I look forward to the conversations about Ava that we are going to have!

~Deanna Brandenberger, AGM Executive Director

*Gardner, Ava. Ava: My Story. United States of America: Bantam Books, 1990. p.198.